© 2017 by Red Finch LLC. info@redfinch.net

533 North 1200 West, Orem Utah 84057

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 exhibitions 

David Habben:
Be Somewhere
06/05/17 - 07/22/17
Lyndi Bone:
The Robot Friend
07/31/17 - 08/25/17
Mark Hedengren:
The Natural Man
07/31/17 - 08/25/17

Artist Statement-

Dance, with its ethereal movement through three-dimensional space became the catalyst for the permanent two-dimensional mark. In turn, the drawings began to influence the dancers as well, offering them insight into their practiced movements and encouraging new adaptations and explorations. This collaborative effort created a haven for the vulnerability, expression, and experimentation that were a necessary component for me to develop new abilities. As a result, a more nuanced comprehension of my illustrative work evolved. Our interpretations would feed into our creations, developing a feedback loop of stimuli and response, success and failure, thought and thesis.

Artist Bio-

David "HABBENINK" Habben is an artist, illustrator, and educator, based in Salt Lake City, Utah. He received his BFA in Illustration from Brigham Young University in 2006 and was a Children's Book Design Fellow at Chronicle Books in 2008. In 2017, he earned his MFA in Studio Art, with a Graphic Design emphasis, from The University of Utah. His work can be found in a wide variety of media, including children's books, magazines, advertising campaigns, theatre posters, and even snowboards. He has recently published a coloring book through Page Street Publishing, titled "The Search for the Lightbulb Burglar".

http://habbenink.com

Artist Statement-

Our desire to be in nature runs deep. We put plants in our office, we travel thousands of miles to Iceland, we spend millions of dollars for a loft that has a view of Central Park. Like salmon, we use our vacation time on a quest to get back to our home...the natural world.

 

This body of work - The Natural Man - is an exploration of our relationship with nature and the many creative ways we find to get back to its therapeutic surroundings. From cliff jumping to Salt Flats car racing, the desire to be in our natural surroundings is born into the human experience.

 

In Utah, we are surrounded by so much nature that it's something we take for granted. We live surrounded by beautiful mountains and we are a few hours away from the vistas of southern Utah. While growing up in Utah County, I don't think I ever gave the mountains a second look. It wasn't until I had lived in Europe and the East Coast for a number of years that I started staring at the mountains.

 

I hope this exhibit will help you appreciate the role nature plays in our lives in Utah. In many ways, Utah is the capital of the outdoors. We should be proud of that. We should take advantage of the wonderful spot of the world in which we are all blessed to live.

http://www.markhedengren.com/

Artist Statement-

We are an overly plugged in society. Our technology is becoming an extension of ourselves and with this technology we create virtual “selves” where no human interaction is required. We can either choose to be a version of ourselves or choose to be another person entirely. This technological simulacra leaves us in a world where the line between virtual and reality is difficult to find. We can be “friends” online and can share in one another’s lives through the click of a button. We are connected to everyone and at the same time, no one. We simulate human interaction while being completely alone. In contrast to my youth, I wonder what it would be like to grow up in this virtual world? Will children look back on their technology filled childhood in fondness the same way we reminisce about ours? Will memories of neighborhood playmates and imaginary friends be replaced with virtual ones?

Frank Baker
10/2/2017- 11/1/2017

Artist Statement-

We are an overly plugged in society. Our technology is becoming an extension of ourselves and with this technology we create virtual “selves” where no human interaction is required. We can either choose to be a version of ourselves or choose to be another person entirely. This technological simulacra leaves us in a world where the line between virtual and reality is difficult to find. We can be “friends” online and can share in one another’s lives through the click of a button. We are connected to everyone and at the same time, no one. We simulate human interaction while being completely alone. In contrast to my youth, I wonder what it would be like to grow up in this virtual world? Will children look back on their technology filled childhood in fondness the same way we reminisce about ours? Will memories of neighborhood playmates and imaginary friends be replaced with virtual ones?

Frank’s works reflect his lifetime of making and creating. his vision is to see the flow of energy and portray that in his art.  finding the connections of the material and the ethereal in everyday life.  He also enjoys painting and drawing a broad range of subjects, drawing inspiration from his travels, family, the human experience  and his quest for knowledge. In his work Frank strives to capture the connections of of day-to-day life and invisible flow of energy in the nature of everything.

Annie K. Blake
10/2/2017- 11/1/2017

My work deals with the layers that build our existence and with human connectedness-- the complex inner lives that appear so similar from the outside. I contemplate ideas of growth and the things we have to/get to leave out in life. I explore the human experience, using the house as a symbol of complex interior worlds and the variety of paths to build or follow, the limitations we allow or break through. The neighborhood, for me, represents our proximity but lack of knowledge of each other's hidden color and mess, and I paint communities to encourage consideration of our dependence on each other and the beauty in our diverse yet shared experiences.